ROMANCE EDITOR TIPS

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Tough Love: Assessment & Beta Reading

Content Editing @ just 1.5 cents per word (aka Beta Reading, Line Editing, Critiquing & Assessment) The following critique service is the most intensive I have come across, combining beta reading, assessment and content editing into a single, comprehensive offering. In this process, I go through every line of the manuscript and…

Avoiding cliche

The Crematorium of Cliche

Guest Post: How to salvage your writing from the crematorium of cliche. by Joanne Fedler   Aspiring writers sometimes ask me, ‘How can I write like you?’ The answer is, ‘You don’t want to write like me, you want to write like you. You want to find your writing voice, and that will…

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The Spiritual Writer

Guest Post: 9 Spiritual Principles To Make You More Creative by Joanne Fedler Creativity, like any other skill, can be nourished. It’s important to remember, though, that it takes time and dedication to tap into your inner wellspring of natural creative ability. With that in mind, here are nine spiritual…

show don't tell rule

‘Show Don’t Tell’ Rule

Rule: SHOW us the goods, don’t TELL us to buy them.   The old ‘show don’t tell’ rule is one of the most important for good writing, and once you understand it you’ll find yourself cringing over old work that suddenly appears gauche and overstated (I know I did). So,…

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Pretty Punctuation

I used to think that the minor rules of punctuation were based mostly on elitist affectation. Petty people with expensive educations that liked pointing out missing dashes and dots for a fleeting moment of superiority. I was wrong. Punctuation, like all literary devices, is there to help the writer get…

finding novel's theme

Finding Your Novel’s Dream Theme

Many writers shiver at the T word. After all, finding a novel’s theme sounds so intellectual, a boring week of high school English you’d rather leave forgotten. But throw out theme at your own risk, because it’s the secret ingredient that will make your story soar, or leave it sorely lacking….

adverbs

Awfully Awkward Adverbs

  An adverb is a descriptor such as: She rubbed her eyes and said tiredly, “These adverbs are so redundant.”  Consider that sentence. The word “tiredly” didn’t need to be there, because we already indicated she was tired by saying she “rubbed her eyes”. Recognisable by their ‘ly’ ending, adverbs…